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Heat pumps

Dimplex has set new standards with its latest generation of air-source heat pumps – A-Class – designed specifically for the UK environment.

But, with the widest range of heat pumps in the UK, no matter what your choice of energy source (air or ground), there will be a solution in the Dimplex range ideally suited to your needs.

How does an air source heat pump work?

Air source heat pumps are able to produce more energy than they consume to deliver a very efficient form of heating. By using the same technology employed in your refrigerator, the heat pump absorbs heat from the outside and raises its temperature to a level suitable for heating. Normally conveniently located outside the home, an air source heat pump is then connected to the internal central heating system. As heat pumps work much more efficiently at lower temperatures than a traditional boiler supplied heating system, they are more suitable for underfloor heating systems, Dimplex “SmartRad” fan-assisted radiators or large radiators that can deliver the required heat at lower temperatures. Heat pumps also provide hot water, which is stored in a storage cylinder.

Air source heat pumps - heating your home from the air around you

Air source heat pumps use the latent heat in the outside air to heat your home and provide hot water. As air is freely available all around us, air source heat pumps have the advantage of relatively low installation costs and minimal space requirements as they are installed outdoors. Because the source of heat – the air – is abundantly available all around us, air source heat pumps can reduce energy costs, especially when compared to oil and LPG heating systems, plus they’re virtually maintenance free. Our relatively mild winter temperatures in the UK mean a properly installed air source heat pump system can achieve excellent levels of efficiency and performance throughout the year.

Flexibility

Our heat pumps can be combined with a wide number of fully compatible system accessories, including buffer tanks and domestic hot water systems to provide complete flexibility in terms of system design. To simplify specification and installation, a number of our heat pumps are also offered in packages which include heat-pump ready cylinders and/or buffer tanks, and all the components required to install a standard domestic system.

Performance

The Dimplex ethos is always to aim for the highest level of system efficiency, with our heat pumps designed to minimise energy use – no matter what the temperature or operating conditions.

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Control

The comprehensive Dimplex heat pump manager provides complete system control over multiple heating and hot water circuits and, where needed, cooling functions. Self-explanatory display text provides simple operation.

Running costs - air source heat pumps

The running costs and savings will vary depending on a number of factors, including the size of your home, your current heating fuel and how well insulated your home is.

However:

  • You could save up to £800 per year, depending on the size of your house and your current heating fuel.
  • You could generate an income which is typically £1000 per year for seven years through the Renewable Heat Incentive
  • Costs between £6000 and £10,000 for an average sized home
  • You’ll need an outside space to place the unit
  • Your home should be insulated and as energy efficient as possible
  • You may need to change some or all of your radiators
  • You will need space in the house for a hot water cylinder

Ground source heat pumps – heating your home with the energy from your garden

Ground source heat pumps use the solar energy stored in the ground to heat your home and provide hot water. They extract the heat from the earth using collectors – consisting of plastic pipes – buried underground. Because the source of heat is free, ground source heat pumps can reduce energy costs, especially when compared to oil and LPG heating systems, plus they’re virtually maintenance free. A particular benefit of ground source heat pumps is that even at a depth of 1m, the ground maintains a fairly constant temperature, so the systems perform well all year round.

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How does a ground source heat pump work?

Ground source heat pumps are able to produce more energy than they consume to deliver a very efficient form of heating. By using the same technology employed in your refrigerator, the heat pump absorbs heat stored in the ground and raises its temperature to a level suitable for heating. The heat is collected from the ground using a series of buried pipes, through which a fluid is circulated, attracting the heat energy and transferring it into the heat pump. Ground source heat pumps are normally located inside the home – often in a utility room, adjoining garage, basement or small plant room and connected to the central heating system inside the home. Heat pumps work much more efficiently at lower temperatures than a boiler supplied heating system, so they are suitable for underfloor heating systems, Dimplex “SmartRad” fan-assisted radiators or large radiators that can deliver heat at low temperatures. Heat pumps also provide hot water, which is stored in a storage cylinder.

Running costs - ground source heat pumps

The running costs and savings will vary depending on a number of factors, including the size of your home, your current heating fuel and how well insulated your home is.

However:

  • You could save up to £960 per year, depending on the size of your house and your current heating fuel
  • You could generate an income of up to £2700 per year for 7 years through the Renewable Heat Incentive
  • Costs between £9000 and £15,000 for an average sized home
  • You’ll need sufficient garden space for the ground collectors
  • Your home should be insulated and as energy efficient as possible
  • You may need to change some or all of your radiators
  • You will need space in the house for a hot water cylinder

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